soins des membres du cheval après l'effort

HOW SHOULD YOU CARE FOR YOUR HORSE AFTER EXERCISE OR A COMPETITION??

This season's major competitions are rapidly approaching. To make sure your horse is on top form for the big day, it is important to give it the correct treatment after intensive work or a competition. After all, it has earned it. 
 
The first thing to do once your session is over is to walk your horse for a while after having taken off some of its tack. It will gradually get its breath back. If you hand walk it, you can undo some straps a bit and untie the noseband so your horse starts to relax. 
 
Once you're back at the stable and have taken off the saddle, it's shower time. Start by washing your horse's limbs and massaging its tendons with the stream of water. This will help its tissues to relax and gradually cool down. Weather permitting, give your horse an all-over shower, finishing with the lower back. 
 
Once you've finished cleaning it don't forget to dry its limbs in order to prevent any chapping, because water tends to build up around the pastern and fetlocks. It will also be easier to apply a treatment to dry or slightly damp limbs than to soaking wet ones. 
There are now several options open to you: 
 
 
  • IF YOU DON'T WANT TO OR CAN'T APPLY BANDAGES:
You can apply clay to your horse's limbs. First, apply a layer against the grain and another layer with the grain. You can cover the entire limb, but the important thing is to cover the tendon and/or joints (fetlocks, knees and hocks).

Instead of clay, you can also use a soothing, relaxing gel on the tendons. The product will create a cooling effect and help with recovery so that the horse's tendons stay healthy. To help it relax, don't forget to massage the limb as you apply the product.  
 

 

 

  • IF YOU HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY YOU CAN APPLY STANDING BANDAGES: :

This means that your horse will stay in its stall while it is wearing the bandages. You can moisten the flannels with cold water before applying them. Otherwise, you can apply gel to the tendons and then put standing bandages on top. Ideally, your horse should not wear them for more than six hours.

 

And hey presto, your horse's limbs will be fresh and fully recovered the next day. 

 
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